'Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's Memory, History, Forgetting examines the reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, revealing how this symbiosis influences both the perception of historical experience and the production of historical narrative.'
- excerpt from the back cover

Translated by Kathleen Blamey and David Pellauer.
Access level

Onsite

author

Paul RICOEUR

Location code REF.RIP4
Language

English

Publication/Creation date

2004

No of pages

642

ISBN / ISSN

0226713415

No of copies

1

Content type

monograph

Chapter headings
On Memory and Recollection
Memory and Imagination
The Exercise of Memory: Uses and Abuses
Personal Memory, Collective Memory
History, Epistemology
Prelude: History: Remedy or Poison?
The Documentary Phase: Archived Memory
Explanation/ Understanding
The Historian's Representation
The Historical Condition
Prelude: The Burden of History and the Nonhistorical
The Critical Philosophy of History
History and Time
Forgetting
Epilogue: Difficult Forgiveness
Memory, History, Forgetting
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Memory, History, Forgetting