'What can we learn about nationalism by looking at a country's cultural institutions? How do the history and culture of particular cities help explain how museums represent diversity? Artifacts and Allegiances takes us around the world to tell the compelling story of how museums today are making sense of immigration and globalization. Based on firsthand conversations with museum directors, curators, and policymakers; descriptions of current and future exhibitions; and inside stories about the famous paintings and iconic objects that define collections across the globe, this work provides a close-up view of how different kinds of institutions balance nationalism and cosmopolitanism. By comparing museums in Europe, the United States, Asia, and the Middle East, Peggy Levitt offers a fresh perspective on the role of the museum in shaping citizens. Taken together, these accounts tell the fascinating story of a sea change underway in the museum world at large.' (Excerpt from back cover)

Access level

Onsite

author

Peggy LEVITT

Location code REF.LEP3
Language

English

Publication/Creation date

2015

No of pages

244

ISBN / ISSN

9780520286078

No of copies

1

Content type

monograph

Chapter headings

Introduction

1. The Bog and the Beast: The View of the Nation and the World from Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Gothenburg

2. The Legislator and the Priest: Cosmopolitan Nationalism in Boston and New York

3. Arabia and the East: How Singapore and Doha Display the Nation and the World

Conclusion

Artifacts and Allegiances: How Museums Put the Nationa and the World on Display
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Artifacts and Allegiances: How Museums Put the Nation and the World on Display

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