'The six artists this book takes up cover a range of sensibilities and ideas that have prevailed in contemporary Indian art during the last three decades — the period after Independence during which Indian art has come into its own as a contemporary expression of some significance.
The first three artists — Souza, Ram Kumar, Akbar Padamsee — are seen specifically in the context of Western art. This enables us to discern affiliations of their stylistic attributes with certain prominent reference points in the modern tradition. The other three artists — Husain, Bhupen Khakhar, and Swaminathan — have consciously tried to work out indigenous idioms to express experiences located in the tradition and contemporary reality of India. They are therefore studied in the larger context of contemporary Indian culture.
The author undertook extended interviews with the artists to work out a pattern of relationships between the life, ideas, and work of the artists to construct a set of living pictures.' (Front flap)

First published in 1978. Includes 72 black-and-white plates. With bibliography.
Access level

Onsite

author

Geeta KAPUR

Location code REF.KAG2
Language

English

Publication/Creation date

1979

No of pages

225

ISBN / ISSN

070690527X

No of copies

1

Content type

monograph

Chapter headings
Introduction
Francis Newton Souza: Devil in the Flesh
Ram Kumar: City-Exile
Akbar Padamsee: The Other Side of Solitude
Maqbool Fida Husain: Folklore and Fiesta
Bhupen Khakhar: View from the Teashop
J. Swaminathan: Wings of a Metaphor
Contemporary Indian Artists
Share
Citation
Rights statements

In Copyright

What does this mean?

This item is covered by one or more copyrights. It is available for research only or use within Hong Kong’s fair dealing rules. Please do not copy, re-use or reproduce this item without the permission of the copyright holder.

Contemporary Indian Artists

Relevant content

unpackingGlobal_list
Picks from the AAA Collection | Unpacking Global
Ideas | Collection Spotlight

Picks from the AAA Collection | Unpacking Global