Ink painting is a unique, ever-changing form of traditional Chinese art. Over the years, it has continued to grow and flourish in the hands of great masters from different dynasties, shaped by social, economic and cultural values of the times. The exhibition 'New Ink Art: Innovation and Beyond' aims to raise the question on how ink painting with its 3000 years of history has evolved through time to become an art form that is contemporary yet strongly rooted in tradition. This exhibition features works by the early masters including Lui Shoukwan, Luis Chan and Liu Guosong, to highlight the development of and changes in ink-painting in Hong Kong under the influence of the city's unique culture. It presents an attempt to understand 'ink' in its broadest sense, seeing it not merely as a medium but rather to highlight its aesthetics and essence. Images of works in the present catalogue are accompanied by artist biographies.

Access level

Onsite

Location code EX.HGK.NIA
Language

Chinese - Traditional, 

English

Publication/Creation date

2008

No of pages

236

ISBN / ISSN

9889844222

No of copies

1

Content type

catalogue

Chapter headings
A Stronghold of New Chinese Ink Art: Hong Kong

- TAM Chishing Laurence, 譚志成

The New Horizon of Ink Art: A Hong Kong Perspective

- TANG Hoichiu, 鄧海超

Hong Kong Art: Open Dialogue Exhibition Series II: New Ink Art: Innovation and Beyond
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Hong Kong Art: Open Dialogue Exhibition Series II: New Ink Art: Innovation and Beyond, 新水墨藝術:創造.超越.翱翔

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Writing Hong Kong Art History

Since its inception, AAA has been conducting research and focusing documentation efforts upon the art ecology in Hong Kong, while collecting primary and secondary materials. These endeavours extend to collaborative projects with museums, universities, and individuals holding personal archives. This section highlights materials from the Research and Library Collections, following lines of inquiry such as exhibition history, art pedagogy, art writing in Chinese and English, and modes of exchange between Hong Kong and other geographies.