The publication is produced on the occasion of a group exhibition of the same title held in Singapore Art Museum in Singapore from August to October 2007.

From Words to Pictures: Art During the Emergency focuses on Singapore during the 1950s when many of the artworks were expressions of 'Malayan culture'. Although this exhibition looks at art in the fifties through examining two art societies, the Singapore Art Society and the Equator Art Society, their contrasts are not intended to be read it in a binary vein that neglects the complex traditions of representing the Nanyang, individual aesthetic expressions and various alignments of political and cultural interests. This exhibition attempts to map diverse ideas and constituencies with colliding and overlapping interests and values, united only by their common desire for political and cultural vibrancy through 'Malaya', a term which represented new political formations as well as cultural traditions.

Including plates for Equator Art Society.
Access level

Onsite

Location code EX.SIN.WPA
Language

English, 

Chinese - Traditional

Publication/Creation date

2007

No of pages

52

ISBN / ISSN

9789810588380

No of copies

2

Content type

catalogue

Chapter headings
Curator's Notes
Art and Ideology - The Singapore Art Society and the Malayan Emergency (1948-1960)
The Importance of Sketching in Art

- Kuifang LAI, 賴桂方

Art and Life

- Gaoshan HAN, 韓高山

Theme and Subject

- Huihai GAO, 高慧海

On the Significance of Landscape Paintings

- Miatee CHUA

From Words to Pictures: Art During the Emergency
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From Words to Pictures: Art During the Emergency

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