'In this thoughtful and engaging critique, geographer Martin W. Lewis and historian Kären Wigen reexamine the basic geographical divisions we take for granted, and challenge the unconscious spatial frameworks that govern the way we perceive the world. Arguing that notions of East vs. West, First World vs. Third World, and even the sevenfold continental system are simplistic and misconceived, the authors trace the history of such misconceptions. Their up-to-the-minute study reflects both on the global scale and its relation to the specific continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa—actually part of one contiguous landmass.
The Myth of Continents sheds new light on how our metageographical assumptions grew out of cultural concepts: how the first continental divisions developed from classical times; how the Urals became the division between the so-called continents of Europe and Asia; how countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan recently shifted macroregions in the general consciousness.' - from publisher's website.
Access level

Onsite

Location code REF.LEM2
Language

English

Keywords

mappingborderhistorygeographyAsia

Publication/Creation date

1997

No of pages

344

ISBN / ISSN

9780520207431

No of copies

1

Content type

monograph

Chapter headings
Introduction
The Architecture of Continents
The Spatial Constructs of Orient and Occident, East and West
The Cultural Constructs of Orient and Occident, East and West
Eurocentrism and Afrocentrism
Global Geography in the Historical Imagination
World Regions: An Alternative Scheme
Conclusion: Toward a Critical Metageography
The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography
分享
引用
Rights statements

In Copyright

What does this mean?

This item is covered by one or more copyrights. It is available for research only or use within Hong Kong’s fair dealing rules. Please do not copy, re-use or reproduce this item without the permission of the copyright holder.

The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography

相關內容

Shortlist | Sites of Construction
Shortlist | Exhibition as Cartographic Articulation
藝文 | Collection Spotlight

Shortlist | Exhibition as Cartographic Articulation

Recommended readings on how recent exhibitions have framed nations and/or regions, and the factors that have driven these geographic imaginings